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1. STREAM: ESPLANADE'S MALAY ARTS FESTIVAL PESTA RAYA[hhmc]
The new works include two performances by dance group Artistari Gentari (above). PHOTO: AIRISU.CO/ESPLANADE

Enjoy theatre, dance, concerts and a storytelling session in the Esplanade's annual Malay arts festival Pesta Raya.

The 19th edition of the festival takes place online. There are three new works and six productions from past editions of the festival.

The new works include two performances by dance group Artistari Gentari.

Mari Menari! (Let's Dance!) Joget Hitam Manis ft. Pucuk Pisang features a medley of two classic joget songs, while #stateofemergency is a contemporary Malay work with choreography by Badarudin Hassan, film direction by film production group SortCo and music by musician and songwriter Aidil Akmal.

All the performances can be viewed for free on the Esplanade website from now until Sunday.

Info: bit.ly/2zW2T0W

2. Covid-19 stay-home recipe: Yakisoba with a local twist[hhmc]

Jazz up yakisoba by cooking it in the style of fried Hokkien mee and using springy chukamen (wheat-flour noodles). ST PHOTO: HEDY KHOO

At the risk of purists hurling eggs at me, I am sharing this recipe for Hokkien mee using chukamen, a type of Japanese noodles.

This dish is essentially yakisoba cooked in the style of fried Hokkien mee. Yakisoba is Japanese for fried noodles and it uses Chinese-style, wheat-flour noodles called chukamen.

Why use chukamen instead of the usual yellow thick round egg noodles? The texture of chukamen is springy and I find that I can pre-cook the noodles in prawn stock for a longer time to really soak up the flavour without them turning limp.

READ MORE HERE

3. WATCH: HOW SINGAPOREANS HAVE WEATHERED THE PANDEMIC[hhmc]

Lilin (above) is a Singapore Airlines crew member who becomes a care ambassador in a hospital, while private-hire car driver Fadzuly struggles with falling demand. PHOTO: GOV.SG

Lilin is a Singapore Airlines crew member who becomes a care ambassador in a hospital, while private-hire car driver Fadzuly struggles with falling demand.

They are among the characters in four short films inspired by true stories of how Singaporeans have weathered the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Stronger Together films, commissioned by the Ministry of Communications and Information, were launched on June 13. The works, which have dialogue in English, Chinese, Malay and Tamil, are directed by local film-makers Royston Tan, Caleb Huang, Alvin Lee and He Shuming.

Info: bit.ly/37OyGgJ

4. LEARN: PAPER MARBLING[hhmc]

Try your hand at paper marbling (above), which involves floating and manipulating paints on a surface of thickened liquid to create abstract and colourful patterns. PHOTO: JEFFREY ANG/ARTEFAKTS

Try your hand at paper mRead More – Source

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