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  • Breath of the Wild in VR? I honestly have no idea how that's going to feel, if it's locked at a 30fps refresh. Nintendo
  • This mode converts the entire game into a VR experience.
  • Thus, the game appears to look exactly the same as in non-VR modes (though we'll have to wait for our own eyes-on with the mode to see how much its visuals have been downgraded).
  • This is the only footage of BOTW's VR mode thus far. Meaning, it appears to look identical to the flat-screen version, only with head control for the camera.
  • Tilting a head around to aim a bow could be cool in VR, at least.
  • And here's a VR update for Super Mario Odyssey.
  • Unlike BOTW, Odyssey's VR mode is limited to specially made, "bite-sized" levels.
  • HE'S COMIN' RIGHT T'WARDS US!
  • You know it's VR because Mario is all up in your field of view.

The Nintendo Labo VR Kit, launching later this month, is arguably the Japanese game maker's first virtual reality product in 24 years. Up until today, the product (which starts at $40) was a self-contained collection of new mini-games, all designed around foldable cardboard controllers.

That changed with a Thursday night announcement: two of the biggest games on Nintendo Switch, Super Mario Odyssey and Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, will receive free VR-mode updates on April 25, two weeks after the Labo VR Kit's launch date. Both will require said VR Kit, which includes a pair of lenses that affix to the Switch's screen and turn it into a makeshift VR headset.

Odyssey's free update will open up three newly designed levels, all based on existing flat-screen worlds from the 2017 game. In these, players will look at Mario from a third-person perspective, which they can shift by rotating their head. This resembles existing VR platforming games like Moss, as opposed to a VR adventure viewed from the famous plumber's first-person perspective. It's unclear whether the camera will remain at a fixed, central point in these three levels, or whether it will follow Mario's movement a la Read More – Source

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Ars Technica

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